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Stephen King’s latest fiction released as a daily video series for cell phones

Maybe the march to mobile is finally picking up steam.
Last month saw the wildly successful Apple iPhone 3G launch (1 million sold in one weekend – alhtough the activations were a technical nightmare) and perhaps more significantly, the opening of their "Aps" store (an iTunes for mobile applications).
Iphone_34
And now author Stephen King is releasing his latest bit of fiction via a 30 day series of short videos streamed to cell phones.

Drawn
by award-wining comic book artist Alex Maleev, and colored by famed
comic book colorist José Villarrubia, the episodes were adapted by Marc
Guggenheim, co-creator of the ABC-TV series “Eli Stone” with creative
oversight from Stephen King.

Nishero.com: Stephen King’s "N." – An original video series

The series began back on July 28th and a new episode is released each weekday until August 29th.Blocks of five episodes will be released on iTunes each Monday, selling for $0.99 but you can get all the episodes for $3.99.
There’s a certain irony in this – Stephen King’s second last novel Cell was a post-apocolyptic horror story that pitted zomibe-like cell phone users against the few brave souls who’d never signed up.

As always, North America lags the rest of the wired world when it comes to mobile devices. I’m not sure if it’s our often punative data rates, our continued love affair with our POTS (plain old telephone service, i.e. landlines) or what, but most of the real innovation is happening elsewhere. Take cell phone novels for instance. When I first heard about these short (usually romance) novels composed and read on cellphones  I thought  they were  an odd little niche. 
Wrong.
According to a New York Times story from earlier this year, they’re hugely popular.

Of last year’s 10 best-selling novels, five were originally cellphone novels, mostly love stories written in the short sentences characteristic of text messaging but containing little of the plotting or character development found in traditional novels. What is more, the top three spots were occupied by first-time cellphone novelists…

In my own industry the vast majority of newspaper’s have yet to develop mobile versions of their web sites, leaving the mobile news delivery service to AP and an increasing number of outsiders who are developing smart little aggregators that push content out to people’s smart phones.
Bill

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